Archive for the 'Picture Books' Category

What I’m Doing at Kirkus This Week,
Plus What I Did Last Week, Featuring
Akin Duzakin, Matt Ottley, and Alfonso Ruano

h1 Friday, November 11th, 2016


“I dream / I am with my mom /
I dream I am with my dad. …”
— From Jorge Argueta’s
Somos como las nubes / We Are Like the Clouds,
illustrated by Alfonso Ruano

(Click to enlarge)


 

“What if I were in a place that no one knew about? …”
— From Constance Ørbeck-Nilssen’s
Why Am I Here?, illustrated by Akin Duzakin
(Click to enlarge spread and see text)


 

“… he continued his search for a speck on the horizon.”
— From Rebecca Young’s
Teacup, illustrated by Matt Ottley
(Click to enlarge)


 

This week’s Kirkus column is what happens when you have a deadline on the very day when you’re slumped over your keyboard in despair over a decision your country has made. That is here.

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Last week, I wrote here about some brand-new picture books about refugees — Somos como las nubes / We Are Like the Clouds (Groundwood, October 2016), written by Jorge Argueta and illustrated by Alfonso Ruano; Rebecca Young’s Teacup (Dial, October 2016), illustrated by Matt Ottley; Constance Ørbeck-Nilssen’s Why Am I Here?, illustrated by Akin Duzakin (Eerdmans, October 2016); and Margriet Ruurs’ Stepping Stones: A Refugee Family’s Journey, illustrated by Nizar Ali Badr (Orca, October 2016).

I’ve got some art from each book below. I regret that I have none to share from Ruurs’ book, but I encourage you to go read here or here about Nizar Ali Badr’s work.

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My Kirkus Chat with Brian Biggs

h1 Thursday, November 10th, 2016

Well, author-illustrator Brian Biggs and I chatted before election results about his new series, and I thought the election would turn out very differently. But right about now I’m all for his vision of communities working together to make good things.

We talk about the series, Tinyville Town, at Kirkus today. That is here. Next week, I’ll follow up with some art here at 7-Imp.

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Photo of Brian Biggs by Sacha Adorno and used by his permission.

A Picture Book is a Machine:
Or, This Machine Tells Stories —
A Guest Post by Susan Rich

h1 Tuesday, November 8th, 2016

 
I admit I’m pretty choosy when it comes to handing the 7-Imp keyboard over to someone, but when I had the opportunity to hand it over to Susan Rich, Editor-at-Large for Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, I knew the answer was yes.

In honor of Picture Book Month, Susan is here to explore the mechanics of picture books — in more ways than one. I really enjoy what she has to say, and it all comes with art from Sophie Blackall, Frank Viva, and Christoph Niemann.

I thank her for temporarily taking over, while I fret over election results. Let’s get to it.

(Pictured here is an illustration from an upcoming book she has edited, illustrated by Niemann. More on that below.)

 

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7-Imp’s 7 Kicks #508: Featuring
Up-and-Coming Illustrator Aram Kim

h1 Sunday, November 6th, 2016

It’s the first Sunday of the month, dear Imps, which means featuring the work of a student or debut illustrator. Today Aram Kim visits, and it’s great to see her here, especially since she has come kickin’ with us before on previous occasions.

Aram’s new book is out (from Holiday House), but I’ll let her tell you about it below — and why she loves doing what she does. I thank her for visiting.

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What I’m Doing at Kirkus This Week,
Plus What I Did Last Week, Featuring
Roger Duvoisin, Elise Gravel, Noah Z. Jones,
Jerry Pinkney, and Eric Rohmann

h1 Friday, November 4th, 2016


“In the murk . . . an eye!”
— From Candace Fleming’s
Giant Squid, illustrated by Eric Rohmann
(Click to enlarge spread)


 


“If you lean close you might hear Sophie say, ‘Oh.’ And eventually you might hear her say, ‘There!’ ‘Good,’ says Grandpa. ‘Thanks, honey.'”
— From Richard Jackson’s
In Plain Sight, illustrated by Jerry Pinkney
(Click to enlarge)


 


“Now all the animals wondered what had become of Mr. Bobbin. …”
— From Roger Duvoisin’s
The Happy Hunter
(Click to see spread in its entirety)


 


“At age twenty, Antonio came to Canada by boat. He was HUGE and very, very strong. He was six foot three.”
— From Elise Gravel’s
The Great Antonio
(Click to enlarge)


 


“I take my stuff to my room, dump my papers out of my backpack, and that’s when I see it: The zipper that was closed is open, just enough.
And the money that was there is gone. …”
— From Maribeth Boelts’
A Bike Like Sergio’s,
illustrated by Noah Z. Jones

(Click to enlarge)


 

This morning over at Kirkus, I’ve got a small handful of new picture books about refugees. That is here.

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Last week, I wrote here about Candace Fleming’s Giant Squid, illustrated by Eric Rohmann (Neal Porter/Roaring Brook, September 2016); Elise Gravel’s The Great Antonio (TOON Books, October 2016); the reprint of Roger Duvoisin’s The Happy Hunter (Enchanted Lion, October 2016); Maribeth Boelts’s A Bike Like Sergio’s, illustrated by Noah Z. Jones (Candlewick, October 2016); and Richard Jackson’s In Plain Sight, illustrated by Jerry Pinkney (Neal Porter/Roaring Brook, September 2016).

I’ve got some art from each book today, and Eric Rohmann also shares some preliminary images (one even going as far back as childhood).

Enjoy!

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The Art of Toshikado Hajiri

h1 Thursday, November 3rd, 2016


(Click to enlarge)


 
Last week over at Kirkus, I chatted here with David Jacboson about Are You an Echo? The Lost Poetry of Misuzu Kaneko, illustrated by Toshikado Hajiri and translated by Jacobson, Sally Ito, and Michiko Tsuboi (Chin Music Press, September 2016).

Since I always like to follow up these conversations with art, pictured here today are some illustrations from the book.

Enjoy.
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Carson Ellis’s Gladdenboot New Picture Book

h1 Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016



 
I’ve got a review over at BookPage of Carson Ellis’s newest picture book, Du Iz Tak? (Candlewick, October 2016).

The review is here, and today Carson shares some preliminary images from book. I’ve got a bit of final art as well. Pictured above is an early character study.

Enjoy!

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What I’m Doing at Kirkus This Week,
Plus What I Did Last Week, Featuring Lauren Stringer

h1 Friday, October 28th, 2016



“Children run in the yellow air. They let it catch their hair and cover their sweaters. They jump and turn in yellow time.”
(Click to enlarge)


 

Today over at Kirkus, I’ve got a Picture Book Happy Hour of sorts. That is here.

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Last week, I wrote here about Lauren Stringer’s Yellow Time (Beach Lane, September 2016) and Philip Stead’s Samson in the Snow (Neal Porter/Roaring Brook, September 2016). Today, Lauren shares some art from the book, as well as some early sketches and studio views of the process of making the book. (Phil will visit 7-Imp relatively soon to chat about Samson and share images.)

Enjoy!

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Rediscovering Misuzu Kaneko with David Jacobson

h1 Thursday, October 27th, 2016


It took many, many rewrites to find the right degree of honesty, simplicity, and child-friendliness. In the end, I think we made the right decision.
Most people tell us they’re glad we handled the story the way we did.
Even one of the folks who opposed the inclusion of her death wrote me recently to say she had changed her mind. She was glad we decided to talk about Misuzu’s tragic end, because it helps us appreciate
her character and her poetry that much more.”

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Today over at Kirkus, I’ve got a Q&A with author David Jacobson about Are You an Echo? The Lost Poetry of Misuzu Kaneko, illustrated by Toshikado Hajiri and translated by Jacobson, Sally Ito, and Michiko Tsuboi (Chin Music Press, September 2016). Next week here at 7-Imp, I’ll follow up with some spreads from the book.

The Q&A is here.

Until tomorrow . . .

Tennessee’s Own Kate DePalma

h1 Tuesday, October 25th, 2016



 

Over at Tennessee’s Chapter 16, I talk to author and Barefoot Books’ Senior Editor, Kate DePalma, about The Barefoot Book of Children, which celebrates the cultures of children all over the globe. You can click on the image above to read our chat.

apteka mujchine for man ukonkemerovo woditely driver.