Archive for the 'Young Adult' Category

Meet Mel Valentine Vargas

h1 Tuesday, February 18th, 2020



 
I’m breaking my own rules again here at 7-Imp. Normally, I feature illustration students on the first Sunday of each month, but hey, I feel like featuring one day. So I am.

Meet Mel Valentine Vargas! They are, as they will tell you at their site, a Chicago-based Latinx illustrator and comics-creator. Mel, as explained below, is currently attending Columbia College Chicago, studying illustration and animation. Mel likes inking illustrations with brush pen work, and they also enjoy exploring new ways to detail and texture their work digitally.

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7-Imp’s 7 Kicks #678: Featuring Noa Denmon

h1 Sunday, February 16th, 2020



 
Say hello to illustrator Noa Denmon. (That’s her self-portrait above.)

I read a just-released YA novel last week (which, by the way, I highly recommend) — Echo Brown’s Black Girl Unlimited: The Remarkable Story of a Teenage Wizard (Henry Holt, January 2020). I was really taken by the book’s cover art, and when I saw that it was by Noa Denmon, I visited her site and then emailed to see if I could secure her permission to share some of her art. Lucky for me, she said yes. So, today I’ve got a bit of her artwork. Here — isn’t it beautiful? — is the dustjacket of the novel I read:

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2019 Sydney Taylor Book Awards Blog Tour:
Vesper Stamper and What the Night Sings

h1 Wednesday, February 13th, 2019


(Click to enlarge)


 
I’m happy to be a part this week of the 2019 Sydney Taylor Book Award blog tour. You can read more about the award, presented by the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL), at the official Sydney Taylor site. The full blog tour schedule is posted here at the on the AJL blog, and I also list the schedule below at the bottom of this post.

It’s a pleasure to welcome artist and author Vesper Stamper here today to talk about What the Night Sings (Knopf, 2018), her debut illustrated novel and winner of the Sydney Taylor Book Award in the Teen Readers Category. It tells the moving story of 16-year-old Gerta, liberated from Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945 and attempting to create a new life for herself. Gerta recalls her past, including her love of music (she is a singer and violist); memories of life before imprisonment when she was unaware she was Jewish until the Nazis take her and her father by force; her father’s death at Auschwitz; the suffering she endured in the camps; and more. Post-liberation, she struggles to understand her newfound Jewish identity, to revisit music in her life, to form relationships with others, and to journey to Palestine. Read the rest of this entry �

What I’m Doing at Kirkus This Week,
Plus What I Did Last Week, Featuring Andrea Dorfman

h1 Friday, September 14th, 2018



 
This morning over at Kirkus, I’ve got a picture book import from Spain.

That is here.

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Last week, I wrote here about Andrea Dorfman’s Flawed (Firefly, September 2018). I’m following up today with some art from the book.

Enjoy!

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What I’m Doing at Kirkus This Week,
Plus What I Did Last Week,
Featuring Jarrett J. Krosoczka

h1 Friday, September 7th, 2018


(Click image to enlarge)


 
Today over at Kirkus, I’ve got a graphic novel memoir that is marketed to adults but is a wonderful cross-over title for teens.

That is here.

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Last week, I chatted here with Jarrett J. Krosoczka about his new graphic novel memoir (it’s a very graphic-novel-memoir kind of day here at 7-Imp, isn’t it?), called Hey, Kiddo (Graphix/Scholastic, October 2018).

Today here at 7-Imp, I’m following up with some process and final images from the book. I thank Jarrett for sharing.

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Animus

h1 Thursday, July 26th, 2018



 
Last week, I chatted here at Kirkus with Antoine Revoy. We discussed his eerie debut graphic novel, Animus (First Second, May 2018).

Today here at 7-Imp, I’m following up with some art from the book.

Until tomorrow …

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My Kirkus Q&A with Antoine Revoy

h1 Thursday, July 19th, 2018

I love working in full color, but I considered that this story would be better told in black and white, because it would give more emphasis to textures. Animus is about looking at things which are very familiar more closely, or in a different way (tree bark, stones, insects), so this was both a practical and esthetic choice. ”

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Over at Kirkus today, I talk with Antoine Revoy about his debut graphic novel, Animus.

That is here, and next week here at 7-Imp, I’ll follow up with some more images from the book.

Until tomorrow …

My Kirkus Q&A with Jen Wang

h1 Thursday, February 15th, 2018

For a while, I’d wanted to write a story about a character whose super power was making clothes that transformed the wearer. I couldn’t think of a premise that fit until I was watching RuPaul’s Drag Race one day, and suddenly everything clicked. I’ve also wanted to do something fun, like a Disney princess movie but with more queer themes attached, and everything fell in line perfectly from there.”

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Over at Kirkus today, I talk with Jen Wang, pictured here, about her new graphic novel, The Prince and the Dressmaker (First Second, February 2018).

The Q&A is here. Next week, I’ll follow up here at 7-Imp with a bit more art from the book.

Until tomorrow …

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Photo of Jen Wang taken by Ye Rin Mok.

Mary’s Monster

h1 Thursday, January 25th, 2018


“… I am no longer a girl / weary with disappointment.
I have become rock / and wind and fiery sea.”
(Click image to enlarge and read poem in its entirety)


 
Last week at Kirkus, I talked here with author-illustrator Lita Judge about her newest book, Mary’s Monster: Love, Madness, and How Mary Shelley Created Frankenstein (Roaring Brook, January 2018).

I’m following up today with art from the book. (Please note: I’m quoting from a galley of the book. It’s possible some of the text has changed in final publication.)

Until tomorrow. …

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Lita and Mary

h1 Thursday, January 18th, 2018

I wanted to write about Mary Shelley for over a decade after I learned that she was a pregnant teenage run-away when she wrote her novel, Frankenstein. That blew me away. Why did I not know more about her life when she should have been an incredible role model to young women? We’ve all heard the popular myth that Frankenstein was conceived spontaneously on a stormy night when the poet Lord Byron dared a small party of fellow expatriates to write ghost stories. But the myth strips away the identity of the brilliant young woman who wrote one of the most influential novels of the Romantic era and places credit for its inspiration in the hands of a man. Countless events in Mary’s life before and after that evening played a much greater role in the horror novel’s creation.”

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Over at Kirkus today, I talk with author-illustrator Lita Judge, pictured here, about her new book about Mary Shelley (and her first YA book), which she describes as “part biography, part visual fantasy, and part feminist allegory.” Mary’s Monster: Love, Madness, and How Mary Shelley Created Frankenstein (Roaring Brook Press) hits shelves this month.

The Q&A is here. Next week, I’ll follow up here at 7-Imp with some art from the book.

Until tomorrow …

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Photo of Lita Judge taken by Ben Conant.