Archive for the 'Intermediate' Category

7-Imp’s 7 Kicks #531: Featuring Brian Floca

h1 Sunday, April 23rd, 2017


“… Then an idea came to her. She found her nanny’s mop and
took the stringy part off the stick. She tied the stringy part to the crocodile’s head.
The yarn in the mop was the same shade of brown as Princess Cora’s hair.”

(Click to enlarge and see spread in its entirety)


 
Good morning, one and all. I’ve got a review over at BookPage of Laura Amy Schlitz’s Princess Cora and the Crocodile (Candlewick, March 2017), illustrated by Brian Floca. Such a good book, all 80 pages of it. If you want to read all about it, head here.

Today here at 7-Imp is a bit of art from the book.

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Remembering Patricia McKissack . . .

h1 Monday, April 17th, 2017



 

There have been several heartfelt tributes to author Patricia McKissack written in the past week or so, since her death on April 7. Tennessee’s own Chapter 16 pays tribute to her work at their site today, as she was born and raised here in middle Tennessee (and, as you will read, Nashville Public Library has some special art from one of her stories on its walls).

That is here.

What I’m Doing at Kirkus This Week,
Plus What I Did Last Week,
Featuring Rebecca Bond, Marc Boutavant,
Emily Hughes, and Nancy Meyers

h1 Friday, April 7th, 2017


“… They danced around the kitchen.”
— From Laurel Snyder’s
Charlie & Mouse,
illustrated by Emily Hughes


 


— From Dori Hillestad Butler’s King & Kayla
and the Case of the Missing Dog Treats,
illustrated by Nancy Meyers


 

“Pig dreamed she was flying with Goose. …”
— From Rebecca Bond’s
Pig & Goose and the First Day of Spring
(Click to enlarge spread)


 


— From Patricia MacLachlan’s Barkus,
illustrated by Marc Boutavant

(Click to enlarge spread)


 

This morning over at Kirkus, I write about Jacques Goldstyn’s Bertolt. You don’t want to miss this book. My thoughts are here.

* * *

Last week, I wrote here about some new easy readers — Rebecca Bond’s Pig & Goose and the First Day of Spring (Charlesbridge, March 2017); Laurel Sndyer’s Charlie & Mouse (Chronicle, April 2017), illustrated by Emily Hughes; Patricia MacLachlan’s Barkus (Chronicle), illustrated by Marc Boutavant and coming this June; and Dori Hillestad Butler’s King & Kayla series, illustrated by Nancy Meyers (Peachtree).

Enjoy!

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Nightlights

h1 Thursday, April 6th, 2017



 
Last week here at Kirkus, I chatted with Lorena Alvarez about her new graphic novel, Nightlights (Nobrow, March 2017).

I’m following up today with some art from the book. (Pictured above is Alvarez’s self-portrait, which I love.)

Enjoy!

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Clapping, Jumping,
Singing, and Shouting Before Breakfast

h1 Monday, April 3rd, 2017



 

If you get a chance to interview the legendary Patricia McKissack, you definitely say yes. I got to chat with her for Tennessee’s wonderful Chapter 16. You can click on the image above to head to the interview and read her words of wisdom.

What I’m Doing at Kirkus Today

h1 Friday, March 31st, 2017


Over at Kirkus today, I’ve got some new easy readers on the mind. (One is pictured above.)

That is here.

Until Sunday …

What I’m Doing at Kirkus This Week,
Plus What I Did Last Week, Featuring Ekua Holmes

h1 Friday, February 24th, 2017


“How to Write a Poem,” celebrating Naomi Shihab Nye,
written by Kwame Alexander

(Click to enlarge spread)


 
This week over at Kirkus, I’ve got two French picture book imports on the mind. That is here.

* * *

Last week, I wrote here about Kwame Alexander’s, Chris Colderley’s, and Marjory Wentworth’s Out of Wonder: Poems Celebrating Poets (Candlewick), illustrated by Ekua Holmes and coming to shelves in March. I’m following up today with a couple of spreads from the book (one above and one below).

Enjoy!

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My Kirkus Q&A with Adam Rapp

h1 Thursday, February 16th, 2017

[O]ne day I saw this older Asian man walking very slowly in the Astor Place area. If a fellow pedestrian came toward him—while engaged with their smartphone, head down, thumbs pummeling their smartphone screen—the Asian man would wave his hand right in front of their face. It was startling, but it actually forced people to look up and consider where they were going and whom they might be walking toward. I thought the guy was a genius. He was starting a revolution of sorts. Stop. Look up. Consider another human being. Connect. I think that was the moment when the idea for the book came to me.”

* * *

Today over Kirkus, I talk with Adam Rapp about his new YA graphic novel, Decelerate Blue (First Second, February 2017), illustrated by Mike Cavallaro.

That Q&A is here this morning.

I’ll have art from the book here at 7-Imp next week.

* * * * * * *

Photo of Adam Rapp taken by Sham Hinchey.

What I’m Doing at Kirkus This Week,
Plus What I Did Last Week, Featuring
R. Gregory Christie, Nate Powell, and Eugene Yelchin

h1 Friday, February 3rd, 2017


From John Lewis’s and Andrew Aydin’s March: Book Two,
illustrated by Nate Powell

(Click to enlarge)


 


“‘IT WAS ONE OF THE MOST ELOQUENT PROFOUND AND UNEQUIVOCAL PLEAS FOR JUSTICE AND THE FREEDOM OF ALL MEN EVER MADE BY ANY PRESIDENT,’ telegrammed Dr. King as soon as the speech was over.”
— From Shana Corey’s
A Time to Act: John F. Kennedy’s Big Speech,
illustrated by R. Gregory Christie


 

From Carmen Agra Deedy’s The Rooster Who Would Not Be Quiet!,
illustrated by Eugene Yelchin

(Click to enlarge)


 
This morning over at Kirkus, I’ve got three new picture books that make me wish I could snap my fingers and be in an elementary language arts classroom right about now. That is here.

* * *

Last week, I wrote here about the third book in John Lewis’s and Andrew Aydin’s March trilogy (Top Shelf Productions), released last year and illustrated by Nate Powell; Carmen Agra Deedy’s The Rooster Who Would Not Be Quiet! (Scholastic, January 2017), illustrated by Eugene Yelchin; and Shana Corey’s A Time to Act: John F. Kennedy’s Big Speech, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie and coming to shelves from NorthSouth Books in April.

Today, I’ve got art from all three books in the March trilogy, as well as art from Yelchin and Christie.

Until Sunday …

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First Ladies with Matt Faulkner

h1 Thursday, January 26th, 2017


“Carrie Harrison lived at the White House when electric lights were first installed there—and she was scared she’d get zapped by the switches. …”


 
Last week at Kirkus, I talked here to both author Ruby Shamir and illustrator Matt Faulkner about What’s the Big Deal About First Ladies, released this month by Philomel. Today, I’m following up with some spreads from the book.

Enjoy!

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