7-Imp’s 7 Kicks #512: Featuring
Up-and-Coming Illustrator, Sophie Ambrose

h1 December 4th, 2016    by jules



 
It’s the first Sunday of the month, which means the work of a student or debut illustrator here at 7-Imp. Today, I have some spreads from British illustrator Sophie Ambrose’s debut picture book, The Lonely Giant (Candlewick, December 2016). In fact, the book may not even be out quite yet; I think it publishes in mid-December.

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What I’m Doing at Kirkus This Week,
Plus What I Did Last Week, Featuring Jensine Eckwall

h1 December 2nd, 2016    by jules


“The light gets reflected on freshly fallen snow.”
(Click to enlarge spread)


 
Today over at Kirkus, I’ve got a holiday Finnish import on the mind. That is here.

* * *

Last week, I wrote here about Hawksley Workman’s Almost a Full Moon (Tundra, September 2016), illustrated by debut picture book artist Jensine Eckwall. Below are some more spreads from the book.

Enjoy!

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A Visit with Hatem Aly

h1 November 29th, 2016    by jules



 
Because my family and I moved to a new house in the middle of this year and since moving is so time-consuming, it left a huge dent in my 2016 novel-reading. I’m trying to get caught up now on what I’ve read are some of the best middle-grade and YA novels of the year. However, one book I did read-aloud to my children, even in the midst of our move, was Adam Gidwitz’s The Inquisitor’s Tale: Or, the Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog (Dutton, September 2016), illuminated by Hatem Aly. And we all three enjoyed this tale of . . . well, I like best how it’s described at the New York Times, Soman Chainani calling it “equal parts swashbuckling epic, medieval morality play, religious polemic and bawdy burlesque.”

As you read above, the book is illuminated. That’s right. Illuminated, as medieval texts are. These images are from Hatem Aly, who visits 7-Imp today to share sketches and images and talk about this book. As Gidwitz says in the book’s opening: Read the rest of this entry »

7-Imp’s 7 Kicks #511: Featuring Tomi Ungerer

h1 November 27th, 2016    by jules


“With the axe, they smashed the carriage wheels.”
— From
The Three Robbers, originally published in German in 1963
(Click to enlarge)


 
After it arrived in my mailbox, I may have walked around my living room hugging the book I’m featuring in today’s post. I did. I hugged it hard.

But it’s that good. It is Tomi Ungerer: A Treasury of 8 Books, released last month from Phaidon Press. Included here, as the title tells you, are eight of his previously-released picture books, nestled inside a slipcase, including three well-known titles (The Three Robbers, Moon Man, and Otto); Fog Island, released as recently as 2013 (originally released in 2012 in Germany); and what the publisher calls “lost gems,” which includes some stories being published in this collection for the first time in 50 years — Zeralda’s Ogre, Flix, The Hat, and Emile. All of the stories in this tall collection, which range in publication from 1963 (The Three Robbers) to 2012 (Fog Island), are gloriously reproduced here. Read the rest of this entry »

What I’m Doing at Kirkus This Week,
Plus What I Did Last Week, Featuring Christine Davenier

h1 November 25th, 2016    by jules



 
This morning over at Kirkus, I’ve got a picture book about family and friends (and one magic girl) gathering around the table to give thanks — and I bet politics never once comes up. That is here.

* * *

Last week, I wrote here about Emily Dickinson (MoonDance Press, December 2016), edited by Susan Snively and illustrated by Christine Davenier. Here at 7-Imp today are some illustrations from the book.

Enjoy!

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Today, I’m Grateful for . . .

h1 November 24th, 2016    by jules

I long ago stopped thinking of progress as a straight line. In some ways science was more open to women before the twentieth century, when it had a less practical bent and was seen as a way to worship God’s world. Of course, women were still excluded from professions, by law more than the sorts of bullying we sadly see now, but loving parents fostered the talents of daughters even when they weren’t sure that they could pursue cherished work beyond the home.”

* * *

One thing I’m grateful for on this Thanksgiving Day is my Kirkus chat with Jeannine Atkins. We discuss her new novel in verse, Finding Wonders: Three Girls Who Changed Science (Atheneum, August 2016).

That Q&A is here today.

I hope you’re seated around a table with those you love and feeling grateful.

* * * * * * *

Photo of Jeannine taken by Peter Laird and used by her permission.

Bread Head

h1 November 22nd, 2016    by jules



 
I’ve got a review over at BookPage of Mo Willems’ Nanette’s Baguette (Hyperion, October 2016). That review is here, and pictured here at 7-Imp today are some illustrations from the book.

I may have, once or twice, reacted over bread this way myself, because … mmm. Bread.

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7-Imp’s 7 Kicks #510: Featuring Leila Rudge

h1 November 20th, 2016    by jules


“The racing pigeons usually returned just before supper. And they always discussed wind directions and flight paths. Or waypoints. Gary loved hearing about their adventures. He would perch nearby and record everything in his scrapbook.”
(Click to enlarge spread)


 
I’ve got a review over at BookPage of Leila Rudge’s Gary (Candlewick, November 2016). That review is here, and below I’ve got another spread from the book.

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What I’m Doing at Kirkus This Week,
Plus What I Did Last Week, Featuring Brian Biggs

h1 November 18th, 2016    by jules



 
Today over at Kirkus, I’ve got Emily Dickinson, the first title in the new Poetry for Kids series from MoonDance Press. That is here.

* * *

Last week, I chatted here with Brian Biggs about his Tinyville Town series. Below are some sketches, as well as some final art from the series. I thank Brian for sharing.

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A Small Thing … but Big

h1 November 15th, 2016    by jules


“‘Do not be worried,’ said the old man of the dog timidly.
‘Does she bark?’ asked Lizzie with worry anyway.
‘Not at all little children,’ said the old man.”


 
I’ve got a BookPage review of Tony Johnston’s A Small Thing … but Big (Neal Porter/Roaring Brook, October 2016), illustrated by Hadley Hooper. That review is here, and today I’ve got some illustrations from the book.

Enjoy.

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