What I’m Up To at Kirkus This Week,
Plus What I Did Last Week, Featuring
JoAnn E. Kitchel, James Ransome, & Øyvind Torseter

h1 August 16th, 2013 by jules


“And this is the rope my mama tied around a small duckie’s neck,
then pulled it along, singing
quack, quack, quack.”
— From Jacqueline Woodson’s
This Is the Rope: A Story from
the Great Migration
, illustrated by James Ransome
(Click to enlarge)


— From Øyvind Torseter’s The Hole
(Click to enlarge)


“Deep below the streets of Paris stretch the city’s catacombs.
Six million skeletons rest peacefully in this underground cemetery.
Bones of every shape and size line the damp, stone walls.”
— From Anna Harwell Celenza’s
Saint-Saëns’s Danse Macabre,
illustrated by JoAnn E. Kitchel

(Click to enlarge)

This morning over at Kirkus, I write about Stephen Davies’ Don’t Spill the Milk!, illustrated by Christopher Corr. That link is here.

* * *

Last week, I wrote here about three new picture books (simply ’cause I couldn’t decide on just one) — Anna Harwell Celenza’s Saint-Saëns’s Danse Macabre, illustrated by JoAnn E. Kitchel and released by Charlesbridge this month; Øyvind Torseter’s The Hole, released by Enchanted Lion this month and originally published in Norwegian; and Jacqueline Woodson’s This Is the Rope: A Story from the Great Migration, illustrated by James Ransome and to be released by Nancy Paulsen Books/Penguin later this month.

Below are some illustrations from each book. (For the illustrations in Øyvind Torseter’s The Hole, the tiny, hollow circle outlined in a reddish color that you see on each spread represents the small, die-cut hole that works its way through the book’s center, so you’ll have to imagine that part.)

Enjoy.


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* * *


“This is the rope my grandmother found beneath an old tree
a long time ago
back home in South Carolina.
This is the rope my grandmother skipped under the shade of a sweet-smelling pine.”

(Click to enlarge)

* * *


“For weeks Camille was haunted by his visit to the catacombs. Zig and zig and zig. Maestro Death keeps time. Determined to compose a spine-chilling song,
he visited Henri and asked for a copy of his poem.”

(Click to enlarge)


“…When Augusta was ready, Camille played a short introduction on the piano.
Augusta sang Camille’s composition with great passion and emotion. …”

(Click to enlarge)


“…The first violinist walked on stage, flashing the audience a devilish grin. He tuned his diabolical fiddle, evoking Maestro Death. Like a shrouded specter,
a lilting melody floated up from the orchestra.”

(Click to enlarge)


“Through the gloom, skipping bones glowed white. Round and round, they multiplied. Cloaked in darkness, Death played a funeral waltz. …”
(Click to enlarge)


“‘Bravo!’ cheered the bones. ‘Long live the music! Long live the dance!'”
(Click to enlarge)

* * * * * * *

SAINT-SAENS’S DANSE MACABRE. Copyright © 2013 by Anna Harwell Celenza. Illustrations copyright © 2013 by JoAnn E. Kitchel. Published by Charlesbridge, Watertown, MA. Illustrations used with permission of the publisher.

THE HOLE. First American edition copyright © 2013 by Enchanted Lion Books, Brooklyn, NY. Translated from the Norwegian by Kari Dickson. Illustrations used with permission of the publisher.

THIS IS THE ROPE: A STORY FROM THE GREAT MIGRATION. Copyright © 2013 by Jacqueline Woodson. Illustrations copyright © 2013 by James Ransome. Published by Nancy Paulsen Books/Penguin, New York. Illustrations used with permission of the publisher.

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