Lots and Lots of Art, Featuring Don Brown,
K. G. Campbell, Bob Graham, Hoda Hadadi, Liniers, Noëlle Smit, Bob Staake, & Even More (with a
Few Words from Kelly Cunnane and Ame Dyckman)

h1 September 19th, 2013 by jules

I promise I have a few words to say, but first I want to show you eight different illustrations (before I show you even more art after I say my few words).

Here goes:


“Look! A RAINBOW!!!”
– Illustration from Liniers’
The Big Wet Balloon


“Women whisper on the corner, veiled head to toe
in malafa, color of lime and mango.
More than all the gold on a bride’s crown,
you want a malafa so you can be a lady too.”
– From Kelly Cunnane’s
Deep in the Sahara, illustrated by Hoda Hadadi
(Click to enlarge)


Illustration from Ame Dyckman’s Tea Party Rules, illustrated by K. G. Campbell


Spread (without the text) from Don Brown’s The Great American Dust Bowl:
“Storms could blow for days and be immediately followed by another and another, making for unrelenting blows for weeks on end. Raging, grit-filled winds shattered windows and scoured the paint off houses and cars. Trains derailed.
Telephone poles were knocked to the ground.”

(Click to enlarge spread)


From McSweeney’s The Goods: Volume 1
(Click to enlarge)


“He swayed, he frowned, he tilted forward …”
– From Bob Graham’s
The Silver Button
(Click to enlarge spread slightly)


“The monkey felt himself being squeezed very tightly. It was his first hug.
‘I’m going to call you Rico!’ said the boy.
Rico hugged the boy back and put his head on the boy’s shoulder.”
Illustration from Fiona Rempt’s
Rico the Brave Sock Monkey,
illustrated by Noëlle Smit


Spread (without the text) from Sue Fliess’ Robots, Robots Everywhere!,
illustrated by Bob Staake:
“Robots spin and race and run. / Robots, robots—I want one!”

(Click to enlarge spread)

Why am I showing you all these today?

Last week at Kirkus, I wrote about Seven Lovely Fall 2013 Picture Book Surprises. That’s ’cause my eyes were big, and I didn’t want to write about just one book. That link is here, and today I have art (more below) from each book. Authors Kelly Cunnane and Ame Dyckman also share a few words about their picture books.

[IMPORTANT NOTE: The colors are a bit off in the illustrations from Rico the Brave Sock Monkey. They are translating a bit too brightly here on the computer screen. If I can somehow fix that later, I will do so.]

Enjoy!

* * *

From Liniers’ The Big Wet Balloon (TOON Books, September 2013):



(Click either image to see spread in its entirety)



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* * *

From Kelly Cunnane’s Deep in the Sahara,
illustrated by Hoda Hadadi (Schwartz & Wade, October 2013):


“Boys in turbans on donkeys go. Men in white boubou stroll. Your sister, Selma, in a malafa glows. Nothing but dark eyes show. More than all the camels in the land,
you want a a malafa so you can be mysterious too.”

(Click to enlarge spread)


“Trees of red flowers bloom with heat. Acacia pods rattle, and fruit bats sleep. Grandmother sits on a cushion to brew tea, her malafa the robe of ancient royalty. More than all the mint leaves sold in the market,
you want a malafa so you can be like a long-ago queen.”

(Click to enlarge spread)


“Then she gives one nod. ‘Zaiyn. Good,’ she says, and gathers a malafa, slips it over your head, under your arm, round and round—a malafa, as blue as the Sahara sky, as blue as the ink in the Koran, as blue as a stranger’s eye.”
(Click to enlarge spread)


“Bats fill the sky. The sun slowly dips behind the dunes, and now, standing on the roof, you understand: a malafa is for beauty, a malafa is for mystery, a malafa is for tradition and belonging. But even more, it is for something else.
‘I know what a malafa is for,’ you tell Mama.”

(Click to enlarge spread)

Kelly Cunnane: I taught in The Sahara. I asked the Muslim African, Moor, and Haratin women about their malafa, their veils, and Deep in the Sahara is their answer.

The original illustrations that I saw by Hoda were the most adorable collages I had ever seen, so when the final illustrations arrived, I was so surprised at the change that I actually questioned it. Her originals—which were far more “cute”/playful, full of visible cloth and yarn textures—had been on my wall and as my screensaver for a year! Anne Schwartz’s assistant, Stephanie Pitt, patiently explained that the book had adults in it and adult themes, so cuteness would not support the material, as well as the final illustrations, which are both representative of the adult aspect, as well as sweet.

For some reason, I didn’t realize how pro-female the book is until I saw Hoda’s illustrations. Her use of color and shape in illustrating the women is such a great celebration. I was enormously privileged to work with a woman from Iran. And that Anne [Schwartz] would know to combine us is Anne’s gift. Hoda gently straightened me out on more than one cultural misunderstanding. To make sure the book embraced one of the strongest caste systems still in place in the world took a lot of painstaking attention; that the white Moors, the tribal Africans, and the Haratin people (descendants of the slaves to the Moors) were all equally represented was a driving point all the way through the work. For example, the working title of the book was Mina’s Malafa, which we all liked so much, but the more I learned, the more I saw that the name in no way represented the other groups of veil wearers in the country, so to be more politically correct, in my way of thinking, I had to find a name that was found in all three groups: Lalla.

* * *

From Ame Dyckman’s Tea Party Rules,
illustrated by K. G. Campbell (Viking, October 2013):


“She carried Cub to her room. Cub liked being messy. He did not want to be neat.”
(Click to enlarge spread)



(Click either image to see spread in its entirety)



(Click either image to see spread in its entirety)

Ame Dyckman: Tea Party Rules was a riot to make. I had so much fun with this book! Michael Bond’s A Bear Called Paddington was one of my childhood faves (still is!), so I’ve always believed a small bear could pop into someone’s life at any moment. And what better event than a backyard tea party?

But this party’s prep wasn’t quick: Tea Party Rules was carried around in my pocket for at least a year-and-a-half before it read anything like the TPR of today. (I have 13 different drafts on my computer, and a few hard copy drafts more became manuscript confetti in the washing machine. I gotta start checking my pockets before laundry day.) At various times, there were additional protagonists (more bears), a different title (Cookies for Cubs), and an alternate ending that just didn’t ring kid-true, like this one. But with all the fabulous advice from the TPR team (Super Agent Guy Scott Treimel, Editor Extraordinaire Leila Sales, and the whole amazing crew at Viking Children’s) and the hysterical art from master-of-facial expressions K.G. Campbell—you should’ve seen me running around the room laughing when I got his sketches!—I hope we’ve created a book party everybody would like to join.

* * *

From Don Brown’s The Great American Dust Bowl
(Houghton Mifflin, October 2013):


“One duster trapped a small plane, tossing it and choking its engine with dirt. At its controls was Charles Lindbergh, first to fly solo across the Atlantic. He made a forced emergency landing, proving that even a legendary aviator
was no match for a dust storm.”

(Click to enlarge spread)

* * *

From McSweeney’s The Goods: Volume 1 (October 2013)
(Illustrators are named in the bottom right hand corner of each image.
See also the credits at the bottom of this post):


(Click to enlarge)


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(Click to enlarge cover)

* * *

From Bob Graham’s The Silver Button
(Candlewick, October 2013):


“Over on City Beach, Belle and Vashti popped seaweed. On the shoreline, Paddy dried off while Jock scratched his back in the sand. Sunlight hit the windows of the city and phones rang in a thousand offices and pockets.”
(Click to enlarge spread slightly)

* * *

From Fiona Rempt’s Rico the Brave Sock Monkey,
illustrated by Noëlle Smit
(Little Golden Books, August 2013):


“The next morning, when the store opened, another lady came in. She looked at all the toys—and then she took the sock monkey’s hand and gave him a big smile.
‘Would you like to come home with me?’ she asked him.
‘Someone very special is waiting for you.’”


“‘How exciting!’ thought the sock monkey. And he wasn’t afraid,
even when he was wrapped up in tissue paper.”


“Then the sock monkey felt the crinkly tissue paper coming off. He looked up to see a boy’s two brown eyes gazing down at him. He’d never seen anything so beautiful!”


“… and once again, he felt himself being squeezed very tightly. He knew he’d found a new best friend. Rico was the happiest sock monkey in the world,
and was afraid of almost nothing.”

* * *

From Sue Fliess’ Robots, Robots Everywhere!,
illustrated by Bob Staake (Little Golden Books, August 2013):


“On the ground / and in the air, / Robots, robots / everywhere!”
(Click to enlarge spread)


“Under couches, over rugs, / Vacuum robots have no plugs. /
Robot dogs roll over, bark. / Can we take them to the park?”

(Click to enlarge spread)


“Robots weld and paint and blast. / Robots build cars really fast!”
(Click to enlarge spread)


“Rescue robots seek and find.”
(Click to enlarge spread)



 

* * * * * * *

THE BIG WET BALLOON. Copyright © 2013 by Liniers & RAW Junior, LLC. Illustrations reproduced by permission of the publisher, TOON Books.

DEEP IN THE SAHARA. Copyright © 2013 by Kelly Cunnane. Illustrations © 2013 by Hoda Hadadi. Published by Schwartz & Wade Books, New York. Illustrations reproduced by permission of the publisher.

TEA PARTY RULES. Copyright © 2013 by Ame Dyckman. Illustrations © 2013 by K. G. Campbell. Published by Viking Juvenile, New York. Illustrations reproduced by permission of the publisher.

THE GREAT AMERICAN DUST BOWL. Copyright © 2013 by Don Brown. Published by Houghton Mifflin, Boston. Illustrations reproduced by permission of Don Brown.

THE GOODS was edited and designed by Mac Barnett and Brian McMullen. Images appear courtesy of Big Picture Press, McSweeney’s, and the contributors. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Candlewick Press, Somerville, MA.

GOODS 3 credits:
“Elephant & Piggie Comix!” by Mo Willems
“Connect the Words” by Brian McMullen
“Cyclopic Ants” by Shawn Harris
“Treasure Hunt” by Dan Santat

GOODS 6 credits:
“Hero Milk” by Eric Wolfinger & Mac Barnett & Walter Green
“The Case of the Invisible Monster” by Stefan G. Bucher
“Awwww Crumb-Steak!” by Shawn Harris
Spelling game by Brian McMullen

GOODS 8 credits:
“Uncle Jon’s Krazy Korner” by Jon Scieszka
“Sharpen Your Eyeballs” by Scott Teplin
“How To” by Jory John & Avery Monsen
Maze by Aaron Renier

GOODS 26 credits:
“Napoleon—The Emperor of the French” by Greg Pizzoli
“Do-It-Yourself Confetti Kit” by Brian McMullen
“Jack Passion Interview” by Jon Korn & Wesley Allsbrook

GOODS 39 credits:
“How To Fake a Horrible Fake Illness” by Jenny Traig & Jon Adams
“Find the Word” by Goods Executive Staff
“Spot the Differences” by Jon Klassen
“The Word Mint” by Brian McMullen

GOODS 40 credits:
“Cook With Your Face” by Jon Korn & Susan Garrett
“Alternative Pets” by Michaelanne Petrella
“Sharpen Your Eyeballs” by Scott Teplin
“Angry Avianautics” by Kevin Cornell
“Find the Word” by Brian McMullen

THE SILVER BUTTON. Copyright © 2013 by Bob Graham. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Candlewick Press, Somerville, MA on behalf of Walker Books, London.

RICO THE BRAVE SOCK MONKEY. Translation copyright © 2013 by Rubinstein Publishing. Illustrations copyright © 2009 by Noëlle Smit. Originally published in the Netherlands. Text copyright © 2009 by Fiona Rempt. Published in 2013 in the States by Golden Books, New York. Illustrations reproduced by permission of the publisher.

ROBOTS, ROBOTS EVERYWHERE! Copyright © 2013 by Sue Fliess. Illustrations © 2013 by Bob Staake. Illustrations reproduced by permission of the publisher, Golden Books, New York, as well as the illustrator.

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3 comments to “Lots and Lots of Art, Featuring Don Brown,
K. G. Campbell, Bob Graham, Hoda Hadadi, Liniers, Noëlle Smit, Bob Staake, & Even More (with a
Few Words from Kelly Cunnane and Ame Dyckman)”

  1. The Wet Balloon and Deep in the Sahara look like keepers, and the colors are so danged VIVID in Rico, The Brave Sock Monkey, that I got a flash of Curious George from the 70′s.

    I could see THE GOODS being pored over during SSR by my fifth grade boys, but for me, that would have been too chaotic. It’s always interesting what kids like and don’t. It took me ’til my teen years to appreciate Where’s Waldo properly!


  2. Oh my – what a visual feast! Thank Jules… x


  3. This post was like a hug and a bubble bath and a glass of port for my eyeballs, loved every illo.


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