What I’m Up To at Kirkus This Week,
Plus What I Did Last Week, Featuring John Burningham

h1 September 27th, 2013 by jules


“Hare took the other end of the rope and went down to the river to talk to Hippopotamus. ‘What on earth do you want now, you silly long-eared, big-whiskered nerd?’ said Hippopotamus. ‘Although you think I am a tiny wimpy thing, if you have a tug-of-war with me,’ said Hare, ‘I know I would win.’ ‘You! Win against me? You must be joking!’ said Hippopotamus. ‘There is no way a little speck like you
could possibly win against mighty me.'”

(Click to enlarge spread slightly)


“Some time later, Elephant and Hippopotamus pulled the rope close enough that they finally came face-to-face. ‘What are you doing, Hippopotamus?’ said Elephant.
‘I thought I was having a tug-of-war with Hare.’ ‘So did I,’ said Hippopotamus.
Then they realized they had been tricked and they were furious.
‘Let’s get the little runt!’ they cried, and thundered off to find Hare.”

(Click to enlarge spread slightly)

This morning at Kirkus, I have a round-up of sorts, a look at new story collections or collections of newly-illustrated famous tales of one sort or another. (Sound vague? Well, you can read it here, if you’re so inclined.)

Next week here at 7-Imp, I’ll feature some art from each of the books mentioned in that column.

* * *

Last week (here), I wrote about John Burningham’s newest picture book, which is only new in some ways. That column—which really ended up as an ode to Burningham, as I’m a huge fan—is here, and above are two spreads from the book.

Until Sunday …

* * * * * * *

TUG-OF-WAR. Text copyright © 2012 by John Burningham. Illustrations copyright © 1968 by John Burningham. Spread reproduced by permission of the publisher, Candlewick Press, Somerville, MA.

Share!Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on Tumblr




One comment to “What I’m Up To at Kirkus This Week,
Plus What I Did Last Week, Featuring John Burningham”

  1. Most of the John Burningham books I read are of the old, weathered variety, checked out from my public library. Only after purchasing a new copy of Borka (sp?) was I able to begin to imagine what Burningham’s illustrations must have looked like originally. It’s great to hear of new Burningham books being published!


Leave a Comment


Note from your webmaster: we are testing a recaptcha solution to address recent spam aggression.
Should you have trouble posting, please contact sevenimp_blaine@blaine.org. Thanks.